This picturesque district is mostly responsible for the island’s recognizably around the world. Little Venice is that small seaside neighborhood with the colorful Captains’ Houses, which resembles a real-life postcard. Around the middle of the 18th century, the wealthy merchants and ship owners of the times begun to build the beautiful white mansions with the red and blue roofed verandahs literally constructed in the sea, on the right side of Alefkandra Bay. This was the turning point for the area’s tourist identity: the quaint houses were restored, renovated and turned into romantic villas, cocktail bars and restaurants, overlooking the Mills and the Mykonian sunset. Drinking a cocktail at sunset is the equivalent to a Cycladic life experience.

Lower Windmills

The most famous Cycladic Mills are another landmark of Mykonos, as well as a monument of the Aegean culture. They once functioned as food processing units that served the local needs for many years. Today, however, their mission is to transport the island’s beauty around the world. From dawn to dusk, the seven whitewashed, circular buildings built over the sea on the hill between Niohori and Alefkandra, are turned into the tireless photography subject of the enchanted visitors.

Matogianni

You could certainly say that this is the most famous alley of the Cycladic Islands. The cosmopolitan passage that starts from Gialos and leads to Caesar’s Triangle brings together renowned jewelers, designer shops, boutiques and bars.

Pelican

The pelican, the adorable Myconian mascot, dates back to 1955 when Captain Charitopoulos morning routine was interrupted when he had to save the distressed seabird from Merchia bay. Petros the pelican, as it was named, was loved by the people of Mykonos and was established as an emblem for the island. The first winged friend of the island of the Winds died in 1986; however, he left behind good successors. You will see them wandering around in Gialos or lurking for fish in the market of Pagka early in the morning.